Donnerstag, 16. Juli 2015

Kunstvolle Illustrationen feiern 20 Jahre Air Max 95


Zur Feier des 20-jährigen Jubiläums des Air Max 95 präsentiert Nike die Werke zweier Künstler, die für ihre anatomischen Arbeiten bekannt sind: Andy van Dinh und Katie Scott. Beide stellten sich der Herausforderung die ikonische Silhouette des Air Max 95 und seine aktuellen Neuinterpretationen zu illustrieren, als seien sie aus Fleisch und Blut gemacht. Die fertigen Zeichnungen visualisieren die Inspirationsgeschichte des Schuhs.

Der Air Max 95 OG und Ultra Jacquard wurden von Andy van Dinh illustriert. Die Zeichnungen des Women’s Air Max 95 Ultra stammen von Katie Scott. 

Der Nike Sportswear Air Max 95 Ultra Jacquard und der Women’s Air Max 95 Ultra sind ab sofort unter Nike.com/sportswear sowie bei ausgewählten Nike Sportswear Händlern erhältlich.


Hier dürfen wir euch noch zwei Interviews mit  Andy van Dinh und Katie Scott präsentieren.

Interview mit Katie Scott


When did you realize that art was your calling? Was there a specific moment when it became apparent?
I was compelled to draw as a child, and was lucky enough to maintain that desire for into adulthood. Around the age of 16 is when I found out that illustration was a potential occupation. At school you can only really study Art and Graphic Design, both of which I enjoy, but neither was quite right. When I discovered the world of illustration things finally clicked and I knew that’s what I wanted to pursue.
Human anatomy plays a big role in your illustrations, what draws you to that subject matter?
I love the detail of anatomy, the symmetry and structure. I am also interested in the history of anatomical study and the twists and turns in our understanding of the body. I'm particularly drawn to the imaginative theories of antiquity, where the body was filled with bile and water, and organs roamed freely around the torso. A lot of my anatomical work is based around this fantastical vision of early science.
What are your biggest sources of inspiration?
I’m inspired by the work of a few other artists like Ernst Haeckel, Cornelius de Witt, and Albertus Seba. They each have very different and beautiful ways of capturing nature. Outside of that I would say botany has a strong hold over me, I never cease to be amazed by the plant kingdom.
You have very distinct style, how do you describe it?
My artistic style sits neatly between traditional and modern. The style itself is heavily based on 17th to 19th century scientific illustration, but the digital techniques I use give it a somewhat contemporary quality. I love the traditional style that my work references but I think it’s important to develop on top of your inspirations, rather than just lift them directly. I like that a lot of people are unsure of how my work is created exactly.
Are you a sneaker lover/enthusiast? Do you wear sneakers?
Not particularly, I have always been a leather shoe / boot wearer, although recently I was given my first pair of Air-force 1s, and it has been difficult to go back to heavy bulky boots after that. I can certainly see why so many people live in trainers.
If you do what are your favorites?
I guess those Air Force 1s.
For this project you were asked to reinterpret the Air Max 95 as if it were constructed out of flesh and blood, what were your initial thoughts?
I was so happy to be brought a brief that felt like I had written it myself. This is the exact kind of project

and subject matter that I'm interested in. I loved learning about the shoe design itself as well.
What did you know about the Air Max 95 before this project? Were you a fan of the shoe?
Although I was able to recognize the Air Max 95, I didn’t know anything about it. Interestingly enough I enjoy getting a project that allows me to enter into someone else's world for a while and learn about a subject I was previously unaware of.

After completing this project and learning the story have your feelings toward the sneaker changed at all?
It was fascinating to learn about good design in a form you have no prior experience of. I like thinking that the existing fans of the Air Max 95 who may not know of its design origins could discover that story through this project.
Human anatomy inspires a good portion of your illustrations, is it inspiring at all to see a designer use the same inspiration to build a sneaker?
Yes very much so. It’s been great to be involved in a project that celebrates that inspiration as well. I believe anatomy inspires a lot of design unconsciously, so it’s great to see it given such a direct shout out. Especially for a product so closely linked to the body itself. 

Interview mit Andy van Dinh


When did you realize that art was your calling? Was there a specific moment when it became apparent?
I've always been into drawing or making things, but I was unaware it was a legit career option. I ended up studying biology and math during my first couple of years of college. The original plan was to be a doctor but I hated it. For two years my life was consumed with studying, doing the bare minimum because I wasn't into it, and creating art came to a halt. Fortunately, I took a drawing class as an elective, and after the first class I had decided to switch majors. That's when I started taking art seriously, and that's when I knew I wanted to do this forever.
Human anatomy plays a big role in your illustrations, what draws you to that subject matter?
Through isolating single organs I've can use something small to represent a bigger idea. Each organ refers to the whole of the body, the human nature, and/or the selected narrative. It is a way to dissect and analyze the exterior by way of the interior. Ironically I personify these organs and I render the interior as the exterior and vice versa, alluding to finding something deeper inside. They are remnants of a larger picture; humanity.

What are your biggest sources of inspiration?
This is always the hardest question to answer because most times inspiration comes from the weirdest places. Usually my ideas come to me when I'm half asleep when my thoughts are delusional and incoherent. I tend to try and make things and work with an ambiguous idea until it makes sense to me. Much of my inspiration comes from the process of actually making things, figuring it out as I go, and understanding how each piece interacts with one another.
You have very distinct style, how do you describe it?
I like to think of my work as old school meets new school, especially concerning my anatomical drawings. I reference vintage anatomical drawings while adding contemporary narrative details. There's always an element of the familiar and the unfamiliar simultaneously.
Are you a sneaker lover/enthusiast? Do you wear sneakers?
I've always been into sneakers. Growing up my mom would get mad at me every time I brought home another pair of shoes. I was smuggling and hiding them in the house, or storing them in my high school locker. I probably had more shoes in my locker than textbooks. I'm more into basketball shoes than any other type of sneaker. My shoes have to be able to function on the court, and look good stepping off the court as well. Currently I rock the “Shadow” Air Jordan Xs on the court. For Cycling around the city I use the LeBron 20-5-5 because of the stiff and durable sole, which is also great for balling outdoors. For casual days I'll wear my grey Blazer mids.

If you do what are your favorites?
One of my all time favorites would have to be the Air Jordan Vs. The first pair I bought with my own money was the “Green Bean” colorway. I also like the Air Force Max, Air Max2 CB 94, and the Air Jordan XIIIs. The next pair I'm aiming for is the NikeLab Free Huarache Carnivore.
For this project you were asked to reinterpret the Air Max 95 as if it were constructed out of flesh and blood, what were your initial thoughts?
I wanted the viewer to understand the layers of the shoe and the body part references. I also wanted to demonstrate how Sergio Lozano dissected the human anatomy to find the textures and shapes of the shoe. Overall I thought of it as a cohesive collage of body parts, with each layer overlapping one another and revealing what's underneath. My very first thoughts were I didn't want to disappoint the original designer since I am reinterpreting someone else's work.
What did you know about the Air Max 95 before this project? Were you a fan of the shoe?
I definitely understand how iconic the shoe is. I was only seven years old when the shoe released but it often comes up in sneaker conversation, and I hear the Air Max being referenced from time to time in popular culture. I am extremely honored to have a part in the celebration of the twentieth anniversary of the Air Max 95. It not only means a lot to me but also to my sneaker-head friends.
After completing this project and learning the story have your feelings toward the sneaker changed at all?
It was already a favorite shoe of mine but I have much more appreciation for the shoe as I learn more about its history and how the shoe was designed. I didn't know it was highly criticized when it was being created, so it's cool to see it become a timeless icon. I will absolutely treasure this shoe for the rest of my life.

Human anatomy inspires a good portion of your illustrations, is it inspiring at all to see a designer use the same inspiration to build a sneaker?
It's always refreshing to see the human body being appropriated in different ways in art, notably something practical like a sneaker. We use shoes on a daily basis so to have one designed around different aspects of our bodies is a pretty cool concept. I can't help but imagine how other body parts could be composed to form a new shoe design. I can also imagine myself creating odd sculptures from collaged body forms. Or perhaps reversing Lozano's approach by taking the Air Max 95 and creating a bodily sculpture. Lozano's design is very much layered; he has created something complex and simple at the same time. That is what I strive for. 


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